Protein power diet plan food list

protein power diet plan

Protein power diet belongs to low card diet family. It is high in protein but moderate in fat. Protein power diet is developed by Dr. Mary Eades in 1997. It is not a strict diet and you will feel satisfied when you follow this diet. But how can you follow this diet correctly? Read this article until the end to know the answer.

 

Introduction

If you’ve been struggling with your weight, your blood pressure, your cholesterol, or your blood sugar on a diet of pasta and whole grains, living the fat-free, low-fat, no-fat way and failing, stop blaming yourself! You haven’t failed; you’ve just been on the wrong diet. If you’ve been feeling discouraged because your doctor said, “Cut the fat to 30 grams a day or less and your weight will come down,” and you did, but it didn’t, don’t despair. Help is here. You can lose fat, you can reduce your cholesterol and triglycerides, you can lower your blood pressure, you can normalize your blood sugar by changing the way you eat—and you can maintain these benefits for a lifetime. Good health is within your grasp—all you need is the right information. This article will provide that information and you’ll know how to eat is your way to good health and fitness.

 

How Much Protein Do You Need?

dr. eades protein power diet

The cornerstone of any good nutritional program is an adequate amount of high-quality protein. Whatever stage of our nutritional program you’re in, it is of paramount importance that you get adequate daily protein. You should learn how to calculate your lean body mass and percentage of body fat.

If you have not already done so, do this now. Your lean body mass (LBM) is the metabolically active part of you, consuming most of the energy, repairing the daily wear and tear on vital body structures, and replacing vital :uids and body chemicals —in short, doing all the work of living. It’s what gives you a reason to eat.

Ideally, you want to keep all of it, every glorious pound, so you must feed it, love it, water it, exercise it, and be thankful for it.

On typical low-calorie, high-carbohydrate, low-fat diets, protein intake is often marginal, and as a result as much as 50 percent of weight lost can be muscle weight. Each pound of active muscle mass lost reduces your rate of metabolism.

The proper care of a lean body mass requires that every day you provide it with enough high-quality complete protein to carry out all its vital functions. Specially, each and every pound of your LBM needs six-tenths of 1 gram (0.6 gram) of protein every day if you are a person of moderate physical activity—that is, you do modest exercise for 20 to 30 minutes a couple of times a week.

That means 60 grams of protein per day for a person with a 100-pound LBM, 72 grams per day for a person with a 120-pound LBM, 90 grams for a 150-pound LBM, and 108 grams per day for someone with a 180-pound LBM. Your specific daily protein need will depend on how many pounds of LBM you have and how active you are.

If you are 40 percent or more above your ideal weight, you should rate yourself one activity category higher (more active) than you actually are to account for the increased work you must do when you walk, run, climb stairs, etc., carrying the excess pounds along. The activity categories are as follows:

  1. Sedentary. If you get no physical activity whatsoever, your protein need will be 0.5 gram per pound of lean mass. Sedentary =0.5
  2. Moderately Active. If you are average in physical activity, devoting 20 or 30 minutes to exercise two or three times per week, your protein need is 0.6 gram per pound of lean mass. Moderately active = 0.6 3. If you participate in organized physical activity for more than 30 minutes three to five times per week, your protein need is 0.7 gram per pound of lean mass. Active = 0.7
  3. If you engage in vigorous physical activity lasting an hour or more five or more times per week, your lean mass requires 0.8 gram per pound. Very active = 0.8
  4. If you are a competitive athlete in training, doing twice daily heavy physical workouts for an hour or more, your protein need daily heavy physical workouts for an hour or more, your protein need is 0.9 gram per pound of lean mass. Athlete = 0.9 To figure your own daily protein need, simply take your LBM (in pounds) and multiply it by the activity category number that most closely describes your current level

The answer will be your minimum protein requirement in grams per day. Divide this number by three to discover your own minimum protein intake per meal, based on three meals per day. Each of your three meals per day should contain at least this amount of high-quality complete protein, no matter which phase of the program you’re following. You can use any standard guide of food contents (The Complete Book of Food Counts, Corinne T. Netzer, Dell, 1994, is a good one) to select foods that will fulfill your protein requirement.

 

NOT JUST THREE MEALS A DAY

Whether you’re vegetarian or omnivorous, you must eat breakfast, lunch, and dinner each day to ensure that you meet the minimum amount of protein required to protect and provide for your lean body mass and that you spread out your intake throughout the day. But remember that these three servings provide your minimum intake. You may add additional protein in several snacks (more about snacks a little later on) during the day if you’re hungry. A good rule of thumb for portion size in protein snacking is an amount equal to about half a protein meal serving. And although this is the ideal to which you aspire, because protein has a balancing effect on the hormones of metabolism, you needn’t limit your protein intake to these amounts. If you’re hungry—especially in the early part of your nutritional rehabilitation—eat lean protein to your heart’s content. Additional lean protein won’t disrupt the metabolic harmony you’re striving to achieve.

 

What are PHASE I and PHASE II INTERVENTION?

PHASE I INTERVENTION—30 GRAMSCARBOHYDRATE ORLESS PER DAY

If you are over fat by 20 percent or more, have high blood pressure, elevated cholesterol and/or triglycerides, low HDL cholesterol, type II diabetes or glucose intolerance, or have any combination of these disorders, you need strong corrective action and must begin with this proto col. Phase I places the strongest rein on insulin output and will help you gain control of your insulin production quickly.

 

PHASE II INTERVENTION—55 GRAMS OFCARBOHYDRATE PER DAY

This phase also lowers insulin production but allows for a slightly richer carbohydrate intake. We o3er this phase for people who need to reduce their body weight by less than 20 percent to reach ideal weight and have none of the metabolic conditions just mentioned, for people who are happy at their current weight but wish to reduce body fat and build lean muscle, and as an intermediate step for people who began with Phase I and have now normalized their blood pressure, blood lipids, and blood sugars

 

Phase I Intervention

BREAKFAST 1 protein meal serving* 7-10 grams carbohydrate † 2 cups noncaloric fluid (1-1½ cups before meal, ½-1 cup during) Multivitamin and mineral supplement Potassium supplement or added potassium

OPTIONAL MORNING SNACK ½ protein meal serving 5 grams carbohydrate 1 cup noncaloric fluid

LUNCH 1 protein meal serving 7-10 grams carbohydrate† 2 cups noncaloric fluid (1-1½ cups before meal, ½-1 cup during) Potassium supplement or added potassium

OPTIONAL AFTERNOON OR BEDTIME SNACK ½ protein meal serving 5 grams carbohydrate 1 cup noncaloric fluid

DINNER protein meal serving 7-10 grams carbohydrate† 2 cups noncaloric fluid (1-1½ cups before meal, ½-1 cup during) Potassium supplement or added potassium

 

Phase II Intervention

BREAKFAST 1 protein meal serving* 15 grams carbohydrate 2 cups noncaloric fluid (1-1½ cups before meal, cup during) Multivitamin and mineral supplement

OPTIONAL MORNING SNACK† ½ protein meal serving 5 grams carbohydrate 1 cup noncaloric fluid LUNCH 1 protein meal serving 15 grams carbohydrate 2 cups noncaloric fluid (1-1½ cups before meal, cup during)

OPTIONAL AFTERNOON OR BEDTIME SNACK† ½ protein meal serving 5 grams carbohydrate 1 cup noncaloric fluid

DINNER 1 protein meal serving 15 grams carbohydrate 2 cups noncaloric fluid (1-1½ cups before meal, ½-1 cup during) Potassium supplement or added potassium

 

Following Protein power diet Plan

If your current state of health dictates that you should begin with Phase I—i.e., you need to lose more than 20 percent of your weight, you suffer from elevated blood pressure, cholesterol, or triglycerides or disturbances in blood sugar, or your laboratory evaluation uncovered abnormalities such as elevation of your insulin or hemoglobin A1c—you should remain in Phase I, adhering as strictly to the plan as you possibly can, until your abnormal laboratory values and/or blood pressure readings have stabilized in the normal range and have remained so for at least four weeks. By that time you should have developed a corrective momentum and the metabolic changes that have taken place should now permit you to slide up to Phase II and a slightly higher carbohydrate intake.

If you are more than 20 percent above your ideal body weight remain on Phase II until you are near your goal. If you are currently on medication to lower your blood pressure, blood sugar, or cholesterol, you should remain at Phase I, adhering as strictly as possible to the plan, until your medication doses are signi6cantly reduced or eliminated by your physician and your readings significantly reduced or eliminated by your physician and your readings have remained normal for at least four weeks. This plan is so powerful in lowering blood pressure, blood sugar, and blood fats that you must under no circumstances attempt it without close supervision by a physician. You will not be able to remain on your current medications at your current doses safely. Your physician will need to taper and in all probability discontinue your medications for these problems once you begin Phase I. Do not make these changes on your own. Once your medications have been tapered and your readings have remained stable for at least four weeks, you may move to the Phase II plan for the duration of your diet, just as we’ve described.

If you are not overweight and have used the diet only to reduce elevated blood fats, blood pressure, or blood sugar, when all your readings are stable you should move to Phase II for three to four weeks and then begin your transition to maintenance.

If you are overweight but have no other metabolic disturbances and are using the plan as a tool to reduce excess body fat and/or recompose your weight, begin on Phase I for four to six weeks, then move to the Phase II plan and remain there until you are near your goal. Your goal should be to work toward an ideal body composition of under 20 percent body fat if you are an average male and approximately 20 to 25 percent if you are an average female. We give you these ideal percentages as targets. Aim for them, and if you hit them, fantastic! Depending on where you’ve begun this journey toward fitness, getting there may take some time, but every percentage point closer that you come to that ideal is travel in the right direction—toward a leaner, healthier you. Take your time; you can safely stay on this plan as long as it takes to reach your health and fitness goals.

 

Read also: Yogurt diet: Fast and radical diet to lose weight

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